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  I’m just gonna say this right now, and if you’re a regular reader, you already know what I’m about to say! … I’ve done it again! I’ve found more adorable, picturesque, quaint and charming half-timbered towns. And no, not just one, but 3!!! And if you’re a regular reader or at least follow me on Instagram, then you already know I am OBSESSED with these charming little towns that are straight out of a fairy tale book!

And it dawned on me last night while writing this, WHY I am so addicted to half-timbered towns. Ever since I was a little girl, my mother always set up a Christmas village on our tables, with little lamps to light up the town, figures I could play with, covered in white snow. And now every day, I get to live that childhood memory when we visit these towns!

Source: Wikipedia

As you probably know, Germany has many different road trip routes to take, for example, the Romantischestrasse (Romantic Road) (post coming soon). Welp, you guessed it, there’s also a route for half-timbered towns! And guess what, I’m in heaven! It’s called the Deutsches Fachwerkstrasse (German Timber-Frame Road) which stretches the River Elbe in the north to Lake Constance in the south, divided into 7 sections for a grand total of nearly 1,864 miles (3,000 km) of half-timbered bliss!

I don’t just love them because of the beautiful architecture and the colorful, romantic streets but because here, time moves more slowly. People casually stroll down the streets, they sit longer and enjoy their coffees outside soaking up the sunshine, there’s a quiet humming chatter and children laughing in the distance. Even the birds sounds more chirpful! Yes, I said chirpful!

Visiting big cities like Munich, Nuremberg or Frankfurt is all fine and dandy but sometimes, you just gotta get away from the hustle and bustle of our fast moving world and slow it down for a bit, if only for a day, to recharge. Taking time to stop and enjoy the simple things in life.

Plus, the drive to towns like these are usually down winding roads, through some of the most beautiful and scenic regions in Germany, which alone makes for a relaxing Saturday road trip!

So, have I intrigued you yet? Are you ready to be introduced to 3 adorable towns? Hold on tight! I’m about to knock your socks off!

In case you’re interested, PIN IT FOR LATER!!

Miltenberg, Bavaria

 

Just near the border of Bavaria in Lower Franconia, you’ll find the small town of Miltenberg, with a whopping population of 9,000 people! Located on the left side of the River Main, this is the only of the three towns you’ll visit today that is along the Deutsches Fachwerkstrasse. The town is nicknamed “the Pearl of the Main” and for good reason too!

Here, you’ll find one colorful half-timbered house after another, leading you from one end of Hauptstrasse (Main Street) to opposite end with no shortage of picture perfect moments. With 150 historic half-timbered houses, you should have enough to feed your addiction! While walking around, be sure to look for the dates on the buildings and find some of the oldest half-timbered houses in the town!

Of importance here, is the Hotel zum Riesen (The Giant), Germany’s oldest inns, dating back to at least 1411 and has been in continuous use ever since! Now that’s impressive! Elvis Presley has even stayed here!

Near the Old Market Square better known as “Schnatterloch”, you’ll find the Church St. Jakobus, many little cafes and a fountain, which is decorated during the Easter season, a tradition most commonly found in the Franconia region. It is here at the cafe, Domus bei Toni, we had the most delicious Flammkuchen and enjoyed the early spring warm sunny day we were having!

Just past the Old Market square, you’ll venture into the „Schwarzviertel” (Black Quarter), which is the oldest part of town, nestles between the Main River and the mountain Greinberg. Here, you can actually smell the history of the buildings, as you stroll through the alley. It’s the perfect setting for spooky stories and scary legends, which you can enjoy during a city tour, otherwise, take a peak inside of the wine cellar a bit further down!

Michelstadt, Hesse

 

Just a 30 minute drive away down winding roads and farm land, across the border into Hesse is the town of Michelstadt. Set among the hills of the Odenwald (forest), the town has dozens of perfectly preserved half-timbered houses and presents an idea of life during the medieval ages, and is one of the oldest settled locations in the region.

Upon arrival, you’ll immediately discover the imposing Kellerei, a Frankish medieval castle built around the 16th century. To the left of it you’ll discover the Diebsturm (Thieves’ Tower), which is said to have existed since 650, possibly once part of Burg Michelstadt, before being turned into a holding place for thieves.

But what draws many people here is the Rathaus (city hall), dating back to 1484 and was once used on a national stamp. This is no ordinary town hall, as its ground floor was once used as the market hall in days long gone, today now provides a bit of shade, while the official business is upstairs. In front of the Rathaus is the main market square, with a few quaint cafes and shops, but there is more to discover than just this area.

Don’t be afraid to wander and get lost down streets of half-timbered allies and crooked streets. You may even stumble upon a biergarten set in a courtyard of a half-timbered house. Beer and a half-timbered house? Yes, please!

Heppenheim, Hesse

  On the edge of the Odenwald, a 45 minute drive from Michelstadt is the romantic half-timbered town of Heppenheim, located along the Bergstrasse, a 50 mile long ancient trading route. Set along gentle rolling hills lined with vineyards, this town has a special characteristic unlike any other.

Not only is the Rathaus absolutely dreamy but the street lamps tell a story. I first discovered it on Pinterest and knew I had to go! It was the most unique, adorable half-timbered city hall I had ever seen, standing tall and dominating the market like a Queen!

Each side of the lamp depicts a scene from fairy tales throughout the state of Hesse. Throughout the year, there are guided tours to teach you about each saga.

  • May – September: Every Saturday 10pm
  • December 26-31: 7pm

As it’s only natural for a town located among vineyards, the town also has a yearly wine festival for those who love to travel and sip on wine! (Me, me, me!!!) With 450 hectors of vineyards, it was once Germany’s smallest self-contained wine region up until the reunification of the country, now however, it’s the second smallest.

  • Bergsträßer Weinmarkt – wine market in late June

Coming here is like hanging out with the locals, watching children play in the squares and enjoying a glass of wine on a warm summer day! There’s not much to do here, but you couldn’t certainly find enough to fill your time! You could even explore the castle perched on the hill opposite the town, which is also a Youth Hostel! (Jugendherberge Starkenburg DJH Jugendherberge Heppenheim)

Don’t skip out on a peak inside of the Bergstrasse Cathedral which was actually built in 1904, although its origins date back to 755.

I highly recommend visiting each of these towns as either a mini-road trip or visit each town one day at a time. Either way, you worries and stress will wash away when you come to these towns. Time moves slower here and you can soak up every minute, stop and smell the roses and put your feet up while you drink a glass of wine!

If you’re interested, there are many other small half-timbered towns in between that you could easily stop at, should any pique your interest, as you’re in the heart of Germany’s Timbered -Framed Road (Fachwerkstrasse)!

If you’re interested in visiting Germany and are looking for more information, I highly recommend using the DK Eyewitness Travel Guide or the Lonely Plant Travel Guide! Without these guides, I would be lost! These are my travel Bibles!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you click on one and make a purchase, I might make a little extra spending money, at no extra cost to you. As always, all opinions are my own and these products/services have been found useful during our travels and come highly recommended to you from yours truly!

Other Similar Posts:

The MOST Picturesque Half-timbered Towns in Germany

3 Bavarian Towns Surrounded by Medieval Walls

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Replies to 3 CHARMING Half-Timbered Towns You’ve Never Heard Of!

  1. So cute! I love half-timbered houses 🙂

    My former colleague lived in Heppenheim, so I have definitely heard of it, although I’ve never been there 😉 I have also heard of Michelstadt, but I’m not sure how.

  2. These 3 places are pure fairy tale! I can see why you love them, they have a picturesque story book charm I can see myself skipping through the streets with Disney animals following in my wake. Beautiful. #CityTripping

  3. Like you, I’m obsessed with these towns as well. I mean how can you NOT like them? It was one of the main reasons why I wanted to visit Germany a couple of years ago. Love finding out that there’s not a shortage of these charming towns!

  4. It’s been years since I visited Germany and I absolutely love those cities! Loved all your Instagram photos, so I’m pinning this post for future use! #mondayescapes

  5. I’m going to sound stupid when I ask this, but is “half-timbered” the style of building? These places look straight out of Thumbelina or Pinocchio! So quaint. #WanderfulWednesday

  6. GASP!! Oh my goodness, these villages are absolutely straight out of my childhood dreams!! I’m so happy that villages like this have been so well preserved – they have so much character, and are exactly what I imagine when I think of a German village. 🙂

  7. How is it possible that you keep finding more of these adorable towns?! Are there just that many in Germany? My mom used to set up a Christmas Village as well, so I have to say this looks like a true fairy tale experience!

  8. I have heard about the first two but not about the last one. I have a book about German road trips and that is how I learned about those towns. It will be nice to visit all three (plus the other ones you have found). #wanderfulwednesday

  9. Love love loved hearing your background story for why you love half-timbered towns! AND I didn’t even know that there was a name for that type of house, they are so cute and German 🙂

  10. So beautiful!! I would LOVE to go here. They’re really like something out of a fairytale. As I live in Germany I really should be doing this!

  11. All these towns look adorable! I love half-timbered houses. I travel to Germany at least once a year, so I have to add all these towns to the list of places I need to visit 😀

  12. How quaint! Germany will have to wait, but I am visiting Switzerland this summer and I have a feeling I may see some half timbered houses there, too! #TheWeeklyPostcard

  13. These houses are gorgeous! They are so specific to Germany that even if you don’t know where the picture was taken you can guess. Beautiful pictures also, Lolo.

  14. Beautiful photos of beautiful towns! I was just in Bavaria a month ago, and I can’t believe I missed these! I guess I will have to go back. I did manage to hit up Füssen, Mittenwald, and Neuschwanstein fortunately 🙂

  15. I looooove the towns! So adorable 🙂 I live in the Czech Republic so I really want to explore Germany more since it’s quite close. Putting these on my list! Thanks for the inspiration 🙂

  16. These are beautiful. I love German architecture. I’ve been to a couple of the more famous half-timbered towns along the Romantic Road and they’re just beautiful.

  17. It’s like you read my mind because we were looking for these type of wonderful, quaint places during our Eurotrip. We had to trim our trip due to lack of time and need to reach our destination faster, but we are sure to keep this post so we can visit them all. So beautiful, so glad you shared this.

  18. OMG, they are so adorable! I can’t believe I haven’t been to any of these…I am German!! Guess I have to travel around my home country a bit more 😀

  19. These towns are seriously SO cute! I love half timbered buildings too, but unfortunately I don’t have plans to be in Germany anytime soon :(. I totally agree that sometimes you just need to get out of the big cities. Life always moves slower in these small towns and you just feel so much more peaceful.

  20. Just beautiful! In my head, these places seem like they can’t be real. When vacationing across the pond, I find the slower pace of the people in Europe to be quite nice. Makes me wonder why we’re always in such a rush here in the US! Perhaps if I lived in such a pretty place, I’d slow down a little, too. 🙂

  21. We’re huge fans of road trips, so we’ll be pining this away for future reference! Thanks for sharing such great tips!

  22. I LOOVVEEE these type of houses! They are so cute. They truly transport you to another time. I didn’t get to see them in Germany but at least I found them in France!

  23. Never heard of any of these! Absolutely amazing! pinned for my future trips! Will make sure to visit them when in Germany! Thanks for sharing #TheWeeklyPostcard

  24. Haha, I had assumed I had already read this because surely you couldn’t find more half-timbered towns, but clearly I was incredibly wrong! You must have some sort of half-timbered-radar. They all look so quaint and charming, but if I had to pick one to visit it’d probably be Miltenberg. Germany is definitely calling me at this point. #wednesdaywanderlust

  25. OH MY GOODNESSSSS these towns are a dream! Fairy tale places are just the best, don’t you think? Places that make you think, “how is this place real?”! Thanks for your suggestions! Definitely pinning this for future trips.

  26. Three more beautiful towns! And this is exactly the time of year to be out exploring them. Don’t you just love the decorated wells and springs during Easter? Thanks for another inspiring link up! #wkendtravelinspiration

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